Conflicts and Crises Put African Education in Danger

Many countries in Africa struggle with providing extensive access to education because of violent conflicts, extreme poverty, and emigration. The African Union has recently met to specifically discuss barriers to primary education.

Delegates initially struggled to set the agenda and decide what to do first. Delegations such as the United Republic of Tanzania and Côte d’Ivoire pointed out that basic and indispensable topics like funding, child transportation and gender violence should be prioritized. They agreed that aspects like technology should be discussed later in the committee as they were “less urgent subjects”.

After passionate debates, the committee started to divide itself in two groups and  formed resolutions. The first bloc was led by Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire and Egypt and the other was directed by South Africa, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The second bloc emphasized support for the International Institute for Capacity Building for Africa (IICBA), efforts to reeducate teachers, installation of oral education transmitting systems and the creation of a student protection program in war areas. The first bloc suggested similar proposals but instead focused on different sectors and workmanship according Camilo Neto. This group also highlighting seeking funding from governmental-private partnerships to bring education to marginalized groups and protect conflict areas in a meaningful way.

The committee was stunned by the last minute invasion of Nigeria by a terrorist group. The Nigerian representative entered the room saying his county lost military and educational funds from the attack. Delegations are now looking forward to work together and resolve this crisis as soon as they can.

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Welcome to HMUN 2017!

The Press Corps Staff welcomes you to HMUN 2017.