Who You Gonna Call?

As Committee V opened, Angela Merkel’s Cabinet erupted into chaos. Though they function as one of the most quickly-paced councils in the entire conference, the room was absolutely silent. Members received a press notice that revealed the nation’s lack of funds based on negotiations made around the refugee crisis. Delegates were forced to cut two of three pre-developed initiatives in order to preserve their economic status. It quickly became evident that this decision would not be an easy one.

In the early morning, the Merkel Cabinet was in a combined state of crisis with the Greek Ministerial Council. Ten boats, each serving 400 refugees, were traveling from the Turkish coast towards the Greek islands. As one of the wealthiest and most responsive nations in the European Union, Germany was called in to provide aid to their ally. By 4 am, the countries agreed to each take half of the incoming refugees while 70% of integration efforts would be funded by Germany; the rest would be funded by the Greeks.

As Committee V began, however, this deal abruptly came into question.

German delegates were forced to choose between the German-Greek Refugee deal, eco-farms and other domestic refugee integration programs, or the €120 billion bailout of Spain to fund. The nation’s credit rating had been declassified to A-1, and though this was not as detrimental as the ratings of countries like Greece and Spain, this was in large due to the huge impact of Germany’s humanitarian aid. Peter Altmaier who serves as the Chief of Staff of the German Ministry and as the Federal Minister for Special Affairs fought to preserve domestic programs to integrate the influx of refugees. He argued that Greece’s refugee deal could be solved by NGOs and that the investment in reform would instead be best for the German people.

In the Greek Ministerial Council, delegates worked to pass a directive titled Police Escort, an effort that was largely cited as being based on Germany’s aid. Council members argued that there was a greater need for law enforcement in refugee camps in order to separate the disputes between the various ethnic and cultural groups. While some argued that these forces could be intimidating, most agreed that in order to eradicate the violence in refugee settlements, they had to ensure this measure. The directive was passed almost unanimously. Little did the Greeks know that this very funding was threatened.

In an unexpected turn, however, the Germans agreed to fund their deal with the Greeks. “We wrote a directive aimed at keeping our agreement with Greece, though I personally believe that we should’ve focused on the domestic refugee issues.” Manuela Schwesig, the Federal Minister of Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, commented. She continued to explain that many cabinet members came to the consensus that domestic issues could be focused on at any time and the relief must be provided immediately. Though this threatened the state of their economy, their integrity, and their relationship with the people, it was done. Greece was saved.

Nonetheless, the crisis did not end there. Shortly after the directive’s pass, Czech President Miloš Zeman stormed into the room with his team of staff. After stirring up quite a scene with fiery screams, table slamming, and translation mishaps, it was revealed that refugees were being pent up in inhuman conditions around the republic, and many were fleeing to Germany in fear. No other E.U. countries were forthcoming, and the Czechs were now looking for German aid.

With five minutes to solve the crisis, the German Cabinet quickly went to work. Some immediately offered room for the displaced. Others argued that the country could not afford to take in any more refugees, particularly in their economic state. Instead these members maintained that surrounding countries should take the population in exchange for their own relief.

Within three minutes, the directive Czech Out was drafted. This motion called for anti-terror units on the borders, protective measures, the classification of crimes against refugees as hate crimes, and negotiations with other E.U. nations for relief of financial obligations in exchange for the acceptance of refugees. The mandate was passed unanimously.

The question for Germany now is where their aid ends. In this session alone, the entire economy of their nation was threatened. If the Cabinet continues to fund their allies and all refugee expenses, they will only continue on this path. It leaves many wondering who would be next to call in the case of Germany’s demise.

The diary entry of a Syrian Child (OPINION)

28 January’17                                                                                                                         9:49am

Saturday

It was just when I thought that our wandering days were over, and the house had started to feel like a place we could call home. Even though ammi was still missing and it had been a week since they said it’ll take forty two hours to locate her. I was struggling to bring some bread home, for we had to live on something. My sisters couldn’t go to school, because they said on the radio that it was unsafe to step out of the third refugee shelter we’d been in this year. They said that countries have declared the actions of those cruel men as ‘acts of war’ and as a result, it was we who would pay the price. They call us monstrous and evil; they say Muslims don’t deserve to live.

Ammi and abbu would read to us every night, I distinctly remember the night we first lost our homes,[ Qur’an 5:52] “whoso kills a soul, unless it be for murder or for wreaking corruption in the land, it shall be as if he had killed all mankind; and he who saves a life, it shall be as if he had given life to all mankind”, Then how can they say we propagate violence, who is to let them decide that we shall be punished for the wrongdoings of shallow and pity-worthy men, who know not of love and benevolence. Had they been brought up under the guidance of the mullah who engraved in our hearts the verses of the Qur’an, they would know the true essence of faith.

How will I console my little sister, at the mere age of five, that she may have lost her beloved ammi forever? Who will promise to uphold the virtues of our religion, if people continue to destroy its sanctity? How will I provide to my family and tell them that I would sacrifice myself to ensure their safety? It makes me laugh to think of the representatives at the United Nations; living in lavish houses, all promises of safety upheld, using fancy words to empathize with our pain. What do they know of true hopelessness? When your belief in Allah is the only thing that keeps you going.

When in Crisis, call the Press!

CNN Logo.pngpolitics

By Parmita Protik Das, CNN

 

The Press were informed through a tip from the Director of the Press Corps that they were urgently needed by the Director of Angela Merkel’s Cabinet regarding a matter of the utmost importance. On arrival, the journalists of CNN and The Guardian were met by the enthusiastic Director who told us that the leaked information regarding the Italian exit (CNN is considering calling it Italeave) and the subsequent revelation that Maas had supported Italy and, specifically the Five Star Movement, was being labelled as “fake news” and was barely being discussed by the Angela Merkel’s Cabinet Members. He gave the aforementioned news agencies the duty to have the delegates deal with the issue instead of ignoring it or discrediting the possibility of such a development.

So the press set forth on their motion to rile up the Cabinet members and charge them for their smugness, that bordered on disrespect for the press.

CNN and The Guardian, walked into the committee room and drew notice to the fact that the issue was not to be taken lightly. We asked the members why they are absolutely sure of Maas’ innocence and, if he is so innocent, whether someone else might be at fault. The press asked for evidence exonerating the Cabinet Member of the accusations placed against him and saw unity in the Members’ response. They had conducted federal investigations and the report divulged that Maas was being framed and had no hand in Italy’s exit. A delegate added on to that and said that the emails in question were sent through a triple VPN-indicating they were falsified. The unified response resonated in their unwavering belief that they were all on the same page in terms of anti-particracy, that is firmly against it.

CNN asked if the people in Germany knew of the fact that one member of the Cabinet may be working toward degrowth and the fact that their jobs could be lost due to structural shift in industries. Responses came from all ends of the table in that Germany had an airtight policy for growth and job creation and would not be susceptible to work against it. They also firmly claimed that they did not believe in dividing the EU and were completely sure that the Cabinet Members were free of blame, in fact they directed our attention to right-wing groups that shared the Five Star Movement’s ideologies. CNN asked if they were aware of the possible danger of one Member working against Angela Merkel and her pro-immigrant policies and if they were taking steps to shore up the legislation to combat such an issue.

On that note, the recognized the weight of CNN’s questions and restated that they were united and no one was plotting otherwise as they were in firm support of Angela Merkel’s stance on immigration. Maas, in the end, conceded that working with the Five Star Movement was inevitable due to its far reach in the Italian government but reiterated that none of them shared the Movement’s ideologies.

Maast Discover The Truth: Whether Heiko Maas Really Had Something To Do With Italexit Or Not

Earlier this week, emails were leaked to the press implying that Heiko Maas, a German Social Democratic Party member and part of Angela Merkel’s Cabinet, was responsible for supporting the Five Star Movement. The Five Star Movement is an anti-establishment, anti-globalist, populist and Eurosceptic Italian political party. This was leaked just after Italy left the European Union, and fingers pointed straight at Maas for his backing of Italian nationalists. Other members of the Cabinet went on to claim that the news was false, claiming Maas was unflinchingly loyal. The Guardian and CNN wanted to investigate this story.

At a meeting of Merkel’s Cabinet, we had a chance to ask its members questions. The first question – did you do it? – was answered with a resounding no (and that was expected). When we asked why the members of the Cabinet believed the news was fake, Maas responded with, “Why I think it’s fake? Because it’s not true.” After, though, he and other Cabinet members like Sigmar Gabriel, another member of the Social Democratic Party, went on to explain further. The proof we asked for? Apparently, federal intelligence services had investigated the emails and they really were fake. Another Cabinet member said they’d used a triple VPN – and again, it was fake. We don’t know if that’s true or not, but here’s what else the Guardian found out.

Q 1: Do you believe in anti-particracy like the Five Star Movement?

The answer to this was, again, a very strong, very loud no. Maas stuck to this – that he believed more than anyone that the European Union was necessary, important, and should not be broken up. While he did say that there were some political parties that believed Germany should be first, he also clarified that they were extremist parties that were not part of the Cabinet. Sigmar Gabriel said pretty much the same thing – that Germany (and the Cabinet) wanted Europe to be strong and united for everyone’s benefit.

Q 2: These emails implicate you (Maas) for supporting Italian nationalists who wanted to leave the EU? Do you want to break up the EU completely?

The answer to this, again, was that the emails were fake, the news was fake, and Maas wanted nothing more than solidarity in Europe.

Q 3: Are there people in your country and/or Cabinet that support the de-growth and structural shift of industries? Do they know about this?

The answer to this (after we were told that it was a valid question) – again, there were extremist groups that wanted Germany to be nationalist and only look out for itself. They didn’t deny that, but they did say that the Cabinet’s goal was to strengthen Germany and Europe economically and socially. That could only be done if the European countries stood together and moved forward. The Cabinet did not support de-growth at all.

Q 4, the last question: Is there anyone in this Cabinet that could have put the blame on Maas?

The answer to this question was unanimous – no. Every member of the Cabinet said that it was a united body, committed to working for the benefit of Germany. Every member wanted what was best for their country and would never even dream of undermining their work or a colleague in that way.

The Guardian and CNN were left with many remaining questions on Heiko Maas’ innocence.

Passing Directive Kanye West: the Preparedness of Angela Merkel’s Cabinet

In Angela Merkel’s cabinet, the atmosphere is tense. In Southeastern Germany, a nuclear plant in a rather heavily populated region is spreading radioactive gases to civilians. The scientists that work at the plant, which is privately owned and government approved, failed to stop the leak and currently reside in a local hospital outside the radiation zone. The responsibility for dealing with this issue rests on the shoulders of the cabinet. As they watch the livestream of high level radiation in Germany, the representatives remain positive regarding the situation.

Surprisingly, instead of solemn atmosphere that was expected, the cabinet promptly and confidently moved on to passing the directive “Kanye West,” which was formulated even before the crisis has happened.

The directive provides four main clauses in response to the radiation:

First, to send in environmental experts to assess the situation and search for possible solutions;

Second, to build containing infrastructure around the nuclear facility to prevent further spread of radioactive gases;

Third, to evacuate the population for within 150km of the nuclear plant, and set up strict exclusion zone for public safety;

Fourth, to provide aid to the civilians, prioritizing women and children.

This directive was passed with absolute majority, though the Harvard International Review holds doubts regarding its effectiveness. Merkel’s Cabinet might be overly positive about the situation that they are dealing with. Our institution fears that they are not taking great enough care with the containment of nuclear gases and the protection of civilians. Also, the practicality and details of relocating the population remain undiscussed, leaving potential threats to endanger the directive.

The damages that the disruption of this nuclear facility can do should never be underestimated. The many heart-wrenching precedents such as the Fukushima Accident and the Chernobyl Disaster should not be forgotten. The Harvard International Review would encourage a more serious attitude towards this crisis. We are prepared to follow up as the story unfolds.

 

Economy or environment? Both fields are crucial for German ministers!

While the European Union finds itself facing Italy’s exit, ministers of Angela Merkel’s cabinet have been discussing the issue of whether or not Germany should keep on assuming its responsibility as leader of the Union.

Thus, the cabinet disagreed on the position that Germany should hold as an individual in the EU; while some believed that the position of leader cannot be denied, others agreed on the importance of focusing on national issues. Indeed, minister of food and agriculture Helmut Schmidt stated that it was “crucial  that Germany doesn’t waste time on economically failing countries”. Besides, he clearly affirmed he was in favor of a more moderated political system and strongly thinks that his ministry could provide great opportunities in and out of the German soil. Likewise, president of the Deutsche Bundesbank affirmed that Germany should stop giving money to financially weakened countries. Nevertheless, he agrees with the necessity of giving the example. So as to  enhance that position of leader, he proposed to investigate about the industries of vulnerable European countries and try to improve them, rather then raising their dependence towards other nations.

Furthermore, when all ministers were looking for solutions in order to reaffirm Germany’s economy, minister of transport and digital infrastructure (Alexander Dobrindt), and federal minister for the environment, nature Conversation, building and Nuclear safety (Barbara Hendricks), gathered aside, to talk out a new directive both of them were writing. Not only did they want to replace nuclear energy with renewable energy, but also wanted to launch “a program of Green cars”, as affirmed Dobrindt. When she was asked about the accuracy of such directive during a crisis atmosphere, minister Hendricks admitted that the issue was out of context. Having said that, she was convinced that this directive, once it would come into effect, would help the country “gain again its position as a leader giving the right example, fighting climate change and all environmental damages happening around the world”. According to her, another key fact to remember is that renewable energy factories are an opportunity to create employments for the low class and refugees, offering them not only a job, but truly a place in the community.

While the European Union finds itself facing Italy’s exit, ministers of Angela Merkel’s cabinet have been discussing the issue of whether or not Germany should keep on assuming its responsibility as leader of the Union.

Thus, the cabinet disagreed on the position that Germany should hold as an individual in the EU; while some believed that the position of leader cannot be denied, others agreed on the importance of focusing on national issues. Indeed, minister of food and agriculture Helmut Schmidt stated that it was “crucial  that Germany doesn’t waste time on economically failing countries”. Besides, he clearly affirmed he was in favor of a more moderated political system and strongly thinks that his ministry could provide great opportunities in and out of the German soil. Likewise, president of the Deutsche Bundesbank affirmed that Germany should stop giving money to financially weakened countries. Nevertheless, he agrees with the necessity of giving the example. So as to  enhance that position of leader, he proposed to investigate about the industries of vulnerable European countries and try to improve them, rather then raising their dependence towards other nations.

Furthermore, when all ministers were looking for solutions in order to reaffirm Germany’s economy, minister of transport and digital infrastructure (Alexander Dobrindt), and federal minister for the environment, nature Conversation, building and Nuclear safety (Barbara Hendricks), gathered aside, to talk out a new directive both of them were writing. Not only did they want to replace nuclear energy with renewable energy, but also wanted to launch “a program of Green cars”, as affirmed Dobrindt. When she was asked about the accuracy of such directive during a crisis atmosphere, minister Hendricks admitted that the issue was out of context. Having said that, she was convinced that this directive, once it would come into effect, would help the country “gain again its position as a leader giving the right example, fighting climate change and all environmental damages happening around the world”. According to her, another key fact to remember is that renewable energy factories are an opportunity to create employments for the low class and refugees, offering them not only a job, but truly a place in the community.

image1

German ministers during an unmoderated caucus.

The Times of India.

Welcome to HMUN 2017!

The Press Corps Staff welcomes you to HMUN 2017.