The Perks of Being a Wallflower

A wallflower by definition is defined by the dictionary as being a person who either has no one to dance with, or is the shy or awkward one at a party, all of which I believe accurately describe myself. However, I believe that this is not an entirely adverse trait.

Now, to get to the real story at hand. The Delegate Dance. Regarded by many veterans of Harvard MUN as a mysterious and often scandalous affair one afflicted with both intrigue and controversy. However, to many new delegates the experience is spoiled before they even get onto the dance floor. The dance is meant to be a time where all of the delegates are able o forget the world for a while and escape to a reality where everyone wants to party and simply have fun. The Delegate Dance is an experience few get to experience and should be admired and enjoyed, even if like me, it may not be your cup of tea.

The Delegate Dance is an event which immediately from one’s first steps they are enveloped into an environment of warmth (of which is not always welcome) and vibrancy. Such an occasion is inviting to both the meek and the spontaneous, the readers and the writers, the speakers and the listeners, and the leaders and the followers.

While the dance itself has in recent years come under scrutiny due to various breaches of security and protocol over the previous years of which include the 2015 and 2016 dances, the effort and initiative taken by both the Sheraton and Harvard security teams cannot be forgotten or marginalized due to their extreme effort to ensure that this year and every following Dance which will take place in that venue are safe and enjoyable environments for all visitors.

Myself, having attended the previous three delegate dances, am wholly relieved and inspired by the efforts and energy exhibited by the security teams, even though others may argue they may be over-reaching in their protection and methods, I feel as though they are doing a fine job in their handling of the Dance.

To shift focus back to the title of this article, it must be said that I am not a dancer, nor am I much of a party person, however I do very much enjoy the tradition and rituals that many delegations participate in. Whether it be the ever entertaining stretching circle exercise in order to lumber up before entering the dance, or even the now expected rush of costumed characters (ranging from togas in 2016 to a pirate conga line this year) onto the dance floor to inject a spontaneous bit of fun to the party as a whole one can be assured that there is never a dull moment in regards to the Delegate Dance. In addition to these hallowed and cherished traditions by some delegations, many delegates simply enter with their friends either to party or experience.

Continuing on the study of the fashion of the Delegate Dance, it cannot be overlooked that many different delegates have many different choices of style when it comes to the dance itself. From Daffy Duck sweaters, to jeans, to suits, to traditional dresses, to workout clothes and everything in between it becomes quite clear that everyone is unique and decides to put it on display when going to a massive dance with both strangers and friends alike.

As this article grows in length, I must address the topic of dancing. As someone who is not entirely familiar with all the technicalities of the dance styles put on display excluding the white boy dance and the occasional head bob and toe tap, I know I have little place in critiquing any type of dance, so I will be curt and simply say I admire all of you who go out there and dance, regardless of what others might think or say, y’all put yourselves out there and venture into the unknown. So, for that I commend all of you who are able and do dance.

Finally, to the delegates who maybe didn’t go to the Delegate Dance for fear of running into the horror stories of years past or perhaps to those of you who, like me, do not view parties as your thing or cup of tea. I urge you, if you are able to come back next year, to venture out to the Delegate Dance and if nothing else at least spend a few minutes just enjoying the moments. For the Delegate Dance is a revered experience and while it may not be the most educational or reserved, it is an experience any and all delegates deserve to experience.
– New York Times, Haydon Bergren

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